If you asked me which was my favourite season, I’d most likely answer “Autumn”. Right now, however, I have to say that I really enjoy spring and the fine warm weather it has brought us. What makes it even more enjoyable is the fact that I stocked up on camera equipment earlier this year and am now able to take shots like these:

Ironically, here in Vienna, the best place to enjoy this season where everything blooms and blossoms and nature comes to life again is a graveyard, namely St. Marx Cemetery:*

St. Marx Cemetery was only used from 1784 to 1874 and today it’s basically a park, though, of course, a park with loads of old tombstones in it. It’s famous for two things, firstly for being the last resting place of one Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and, secondly, for being covered by a sea of lilac blossoms at a certain time of the year. Or more precisely, this time of the year…

The Ravellers among you, at least those with outstanding memory, will actually find this sight vaguely familiar: Almost exactly a year ago, with the lilacs in bloom just like now, we used St. Marx Cemetery as the background for the pictures of [m]’s Dry Grass And Shadows cowl. Come to think of it, we also photographed [m]’s Featherweight Cardigan there, back in June 2009.

Oh, and speaking of textiles: St. Marx Cemetery also holds the grave of Josef Madersperger (1768-1850), one of the inventors of the sewing machine. So, you see, there’s not just the lilac…

… but a lot of other nice and interesting things to see there, too.

There’s daisies and dandelions…

… there’s overgrown paths that look like something Edward Burne-Jones might have painted…

… there’s fine old tomb stones and monuments…

… and, occasionally, you might even stumble upon some rather antique-looking gardener’s equipment …

* That’s “Marx” as in “St. Mark’s” spelled badly and has nothing to do with the author of Das Kapital.

Anticipation

January 20, 2011

As some of you may remember, I started my sewing career last summer by making a little dress for [c]’s baby niece. Although I did not actually sew anything new since then, I was quite busy doing research on sewing in general and sewing patterns in particular, and driving [c] crazy by blabbering about fabrics, fabrics, fabrics, dresses, blouses, skirts and again: fabrics.* The textiles I was particularly drawn to during that phase [and still am] were the beautiful  nani Iro double cotton gauzes by Japanese textile designer Naomi Ito …

… and it was just a question of time before I would stumble over this lovely pattern book entirely dedicated to these very special fabrics. I think what I find especially appealing about the clothes in this book apart from the fabrics just being gorgeous is their simplicity, their clean lines and, at least to a certain extent, their timelessness. They look so right, so balanced and quite unimpressed by actual fashion trends that I can imagine myself still wearing them twenty years from now.

Im am so much looking forward to start my first sewing project from this book! Unfortunately, at the moment crafting time is still a bit of a luxury for me, but I really hope that I will soon be able to squeeze in a couple of hours to get my sewing machine started [even if I still do not know how I will manage with the instructions in Japanese, not being an experienced seamstress at all. The diagrams look quite logical, though.]

In the meantime, I am very happily flipping through the pages of my new nani Iro Pattern book as well as through Stylish Dress Book Vol. 1,** drooling over beautifully photographed pictures of gorgeous designs and breathtaking fabrics …

* All my blabbering about yarn finally has, as you might know, led him to start knitting, so we will see how this will turn out in the end …
** Both books were purchased at m is for make, a lovely online shop for all things crafty.